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What is Cast Bronze?

Posted by Sacred Engraving on 12/13/2014
In order to understand what Cast Bronze is, we first need to understand a few definitions and terms regarding material science. Cast Bronze is an alloy. An alloy is created by mixing at least two or more molten metallic elements that result in a harder, stronger, and more durable metal compound. Cast Bronze is typically comprised of Copper, Tin, Zinc, and Lead. It does not rust, and does not weaken or erode under harsh weather elements. and is known to have a severely long shelf life.

Some cast bronze pieces have been dated as far back as 300 BC. The Victorious Athlete is a bronze cast of a triumphant athlete wrapping a ribbon around his head as the winner of the Ancient Olympic Games. Winners of the ancient games were permitted to cast bronze statues of themselves and doing so sometimes cost ten times his annual wage.

Other historical pieces include Benin Head which dates back to the fifteenth century and originated in pre-colonial Africa, The Charioteer of Delphi which was sculpted circa 570 BC, and dai-ji Daibutsu, (a.k.a. Vairocana Buddha) which is perhaps the most famous cast bronze statue known today and dates back to 742 AD.

Known as lost wax casting, the process involved in producing cast bronze has not changed much at all despite modern technological advances. There are several steps involved in lost wax casting which include sculpting the portrait to making the mold, to encasing molten wax to pouring the bronze, and many other steps in between and after in order to produce a cast bronze statue.While the process is not technological, it is most definitely a fairly complicated, time consuming, and labor-intensive skilled art.


 Bronze Plaques Are Not Third Place
 Will my Plaque be Coated with a Patina Finish?
 How Do I Design A Plaque?
 How Do I Keep the Beauty of Our Plaque?
 What Size Plaque Do I Need?
 What are Some Uses of Cast Bronze Plaques?
 What is Metalphoto?
 What is Cast Bronze?

 January 2015
 December 2014